2016 | HOPE Conference Materials


 

Description

This conference is presented by the Maine Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, in collaboration with the Consumer Council System of Maine and the Maine Association of Peer Support and Recovery Centers.

The annual HOPE conference is designed for persons in recovery, consumers, survivors, service providers, family and community members. The goals of this conference are for participants to gain a greater understanding of what recovery/wellness is from the many paths and different perspectives on the journey of life. It is a chance to learn from each other, network, and gain greater understanding about recovery and wellness.

 

Download the brochure from the 2016 event.

 

Visit the Consumer Council System of Maine's resources page for additional materials.

 


 

Keynotes

 

Keynote | Wounded Healers: How the Peer Movement is Transforming Mental Health
Oryx Cohen, MPA | Chief Operating Officer, Technical Assistance Center of the National Empowerment Center
The notion of the wounded healer goes back to Greek mythology when the centaur Chiron was wounded by a poisonous arrow. Later, Carl Jung used the term to describe the condition which compels one to become an analyst. Today, we look at the concept of the wounded healer in the emergence of the peer movement in mental health. The keynote will address leading innovations developed by modern day wounded healers, including Peer-run Respites, Intentional Peer Support, and Emotional CPR.


Materials

 

 

Keynote | Peer Practice: A Valuable Asset to Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care
Tom Hill, MSW | Senior Advisor for Addiction and Recovery, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Making peers a visible part of the behavioral health workforce has been a major achievement of the peer and recovery movement. As we move forward, it will be important to recognize our value, communicate it strategically, and find opportunities to leverage it to create systems and services that help individuals, families, and communities get well.


Materials

 


 

Workshops


A1: Creating and Promoting Crisis Alternatives | Oryx Cohen, MPA

In this interactive workshop, participants will examine the leading crisis alternatives in the world and how we can better promote these existing alternatives. We will also spend time discussing how we can create new options to help fill the wide gaps we presently see in community care.

 
Materials

A2:
Aerobics for the Mind | Cathy Brown and Jan Anderson

Learn to live well by keeping your mind active in creative and fun ways! The Intentional Warm Line Staff will share their experiences in intellectual wellness and how to make it fun. Intellectual wellness involves lifelong learning, applying the knowledge learned, and sharing it with fellow peers. Participants will benefit from some of the items from the presenters’ Wellness Toolbox. You will discuss and explore the benefits of using sudokus, word searches, cryptograms, crossword puzzles and other logic puzzles. There will be various levels of difficulty. Don’t miss what promises to be a ‘thought-provoking’ workshop!


A3: Connecting Through Compassionate Conversation | Elaine Ecker

Learning how to speak and listen with compassion and empathy has the potential to make a dramatic difference in relationships and interactions. The basis of this introductory workshop is from NAMI Maine’s new curriculum, “Inspiring Minds: Skills for Balance, Connection & Fresh Perspectives,” and Marshall Rosenberg’s book, “Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life.” Participants will discuss how some of our everyday conversation styles can engender defensiveness and disconnection, and how and why language in our culture often reflects competition rather than connection. Learn how to practice I Statements, reflecting the four components using nonviolent communication, and hear about listening with empathy, using reflection and validation. This workshop will be highly interactive and informative.

 

Materials

A4: WRAP Key Recovery Concepts and the Eight Dimensions of Wellness | Scott Metzger and Liz Lind

This presentation will include a brief overview of the Mary Ellen Copeland’s evidence based Study of Mental Health Recovery and Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP). Participants will explore the five Key Recovery Concepts of WRAP; Hope, Personal Responsibility, Education, Self-Advocacy and Support. After discussion, participants will start their own personal gratitude list within the framework of the Eight Dimensions of Wellness, and have the opportunity to share with the group and develop a group gratitude list. Participants will identify a specific area in the Eight Dimensions they would like to move towards and then explore how they can use the five Key concepts to support their own journey and goals in leading a balanced life. This workshop is going to be interactive and will display visually the connection between the Five Recovery Concepts and how it can be implemented within the
Eight Dimensions of Wellness.


A5: Entering the Peer Workforce: Résumé Writing, Interviewing and Skill Building | Randy Morrison

The process for applying and interviewing as a Peer is unlike any other job hiring process. This workshop will cover the process applicants go through for a Peer position. It will focus on building skills and knowledge about how best to convey difficult life stories, the path to recovery, and IPS. For the Behavioral Health Home programs, as an example, one must show how to talk about lived experience, recovery, and challenges within the mental health system, while not isolating case workers or providers. The session will also touch on what NOT to say. The format for this presentation will rely on discussions and some presentation, and will allow time for specific questions and audience participation.


A6: Wellness through Music | Thomas Poulson

Music is a healthy outlet and can be a tool to move forward through difficult events or feelings. In this workshop, through words and song, participants will learn how to explore personal means of coping and self-expression. Participants will work as a group to create poetry and song as a way to realize personal talents, and as a way to create wholeness. Come to this workshop and celebrate your wellness!


A7: Why I Can’t Trust You . . . Exploring Cultural Competence in IPS — Part 1 | Kelly Staples, Katharine Storer and Moon Nguany

In collaboration with Youth Move Maine this program explores why certain populations in Maine choose not to seek mental health support. Using a variety of presentation platforms such as video, skits and discussion, participants will gain insight into the reasons behind these barriers. The trainers will apply the concepts of Intentional Peer Support (IPS) to determine effective ways to connect with individuals who might be reluctant to disclose mental health issues. For CIPS Continuing Education credit, participants must attend all three workshops A-7, B-7 and C-7.

 


B1:
Every Voice Matters | Jenna Mehnert

Make your voice matter! This workshop will provide attendees with information on how the legislative process works, how it affects individuals, and how we are able to influence the legislative process. NAMI SMART training is embedded within this workshop. Attendees will hear a clear explanation of how the legislation works, what are the nuts and bolts of giving effective testimony, and will have a chance to practice telling their story. Learn to tell your story so that it will move the legislation!


B2: WRAP Key Recovery Concepts and the Eight Dimensions of Wellness | Scott Metzger and Liz Lind

This presentation will include a brief overview of the Mary Ellen Copeland’s evidence based Study of Mental Health Recovery and Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP). Participants will explore the five Key Recovery Concepts of WRAP; Hope, Personal Responsibility, Education, Self-Advocacy and Support. After discussion, participants will start their own personal gratitude list within the framework of the Eight Dimensions of Wellness, and have the opportunity to share with the group and develop a group gratitude list. Participants will identify a specific area in the Eight Dimensions they would like to move towards and then explore how they can use the five Key concepts to support their own journey and goals in leading a balanced life. This workshop is going to be interactive and will display visually the connection between the Five Recovery Concepts and how it can be implemented within the
Eight Dimensions of Wellness.


B3: Self-Awareness in Handling Every Day Challenges in Recovery | Nancy Michaud

This workshop will focus on how to deal effectively with negative thinking that results from experiences of trauma, addiction, physical or psychological abuse, or any other of life’s struggles. Participants will hear how positive thinking and self-care can be present every day, and will share about useful strategies that may have helped them in challenging times. This workshop will give participants a toolbox of resources to use in their personal recovery journeys.


B4: Panel: Self-Discovery through Sharing Our Stories | Nancy Boucher, Morgan Danae and Sara Paulsen

This panel gives participants an inside view of personal experience with mental health. The panel will speak about what has helped, and what has hindered, throughout the recovery process. In sharing this way, the panel hopes to give others insight that will help them in their personal journeys. The stories are told in an inclusive setting to help educate the public about mental health, to help reduce stigma, and is presented with a focus on recovery.


B5: Supported Decision-Making and Alternatives to Guardianship | Lydia Paquette

Decision-making is a skill like any other. We each process information differently and react based on different priorities and life experiences. Similarly, we all experience difficulties in decision-making at one time or another. For individuals experiencing limitations in decisionmaking, guardianship may feel like the only answer. Though it is one solution, guardianship does not allow for an individualized assessment of the decision-making process and can forego an opportunity for the individual to grow and enhance their decision-making capabilities. Many tools exist to identify and accommodate those limitations while promoting self-determinations. These tools are generally referred to as “alternatives to guardianship”. This training provides a general overview of the decision-making process and how guardianship and alternatives to guardianship are used to assist in that process.


B6: Systems Change: One Relationship at a Time | Melissa Caswell and Vickie McCarty

This workshop will provide participants with tools to help them actively work on systems change through legislative action. Participants will see how, through working at the systems level, they can impact not just their lives, but also the lives of others. In discussion, participants will learn how they can have a voice in systems change and how this fits in with the eight dimensions of wellness. Each attendee will also get the chance to participate in activities and small group discussions that will allow them to practice what they have learned. Take the first step to become involved in making a difference by becoming agents for positive systems change!

 

Materials

B7: Why I Can’t Trust You . . . Exploring Cultural Competence in IPS — Part 2 | Kelly Staples, Katharine Storer and Moon Nguany

B8: On Bending Not Breaking: Yoga in Recovery | Emily Johnson

Yoga can certainly help people become more physically fit and develop better mental focus, but more importantly, it can bring the type of inner peace which extends outward to all situations and people. In this workshop, participants will be led through a basic yoga routine, including sun salutations and some standing and sitting poses. They will hear a brief summary of the key findings of researcher Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, a psychiatrist who has been treating people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other types of trauma for more than 40 years. Participants will learn how yoga can help them practice emotional regulation when managing trauma symptoms and anxiety. Participants will have an opportunity to learn specific breathing techniques to gain a sense of being more grounded, as well as poses which regulate emotions. Parallels between a yogic practice and the guiding principles of the 12 steps, particularly a moral inventory, radical acceptance, and the need to be of service to others will be discussed.

 


C1:
The Positive Effects of Volunteerism on Personal Recovery and Wellness | Dorie Oakes

Through shared experience of the positive outcomes that can come from volunteering, this workshop will encourage people to get out and give back to their communities. Participants will learn about the incentives and barriers to volunteering. Topics include a volunteering assessment, learned skills that can be offered – and with training, new skills – and what agencies might be looking for. In this workshop, participants will understand who should volunteer, and how this could lead to job placement!


C2: Wellness and Work: WRAP® for Work | Paula Gustafson and Ken Bragg

This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how to approach the topic of wellness during their supervision time. Participants will leave with a workbook to develop their own WRAP® for Work – an action plan to divert having a mental health crisis that may prevent them from working. Participants will explore, through interactive conversation, how individual wellness can introduce a culture of wellness into the workplace.

 

Materials

C3: Recovering People, Recovering Communities | Andrew Kiezulas and Shelby Briggs

A huge part of our humanity revolves around our ability to support and empower each other. Whether it’s another person in recovery, or just someone in need, giving back plays a significant role in our collective and personal wellness. This workshop will introduce participants to YPR (Young people in Recovery), and demonstrate how it reaches individuals, communities, and policy makers with its comprehensive and dynamic recovery network. Join in this conversation and hear what some of the collaborative recovery efforts are across the State.

 

Materials

C4: More Than a Label: Fostering Recovery Through Discovering and Nourishing Identity and Individuality | Whitney Parrish and Bruce King

A diagnosis can be a blessing and it can be a curse: It can open doors to treatment and support that facilitate recovery and inspire hope. It can also foster hopelessness, by informing an individual’s identity from the moment it is given—it can become ones identity. This workshop will help participants understand what identity is and discuss its important role in recovery. The presenters will share tools and methods to center on the process of selfdiscovery and expanding outward to “find your tribe.” Some components of identity such as race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, and subcultures will be discussed.


C5: Writing for Discovery and Strength | Kelly Jean Richardson

This workshop will cover new ways of writing that will enhance the benefits far beyond traditional journal writing. Participants will learn how to write a story about a personal event using the point-of-view of multiple characters, and will also learn how to write a story about an important personal choice. Using these and other methods of writing, participants will begin to understand how various writing styles can enable us to make healthy choices, improve our relationships, and to create a happy, healthy life.

 

Materials

C6: Make Your Voice Heard: A survey of YOUR needs for future mental health system development | Kevin Voyvodich and Cathy Bustin

This workshop will give a brief overview of the reasons behind the PAIMI (Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness) statewide survey, the method that will be used, the reasoning behind the questions, and the goal of collecting this information. Information will be provided for attendees to spread the word about the importance of the survey to other consumers in their communities. There will be opportunities for participants to take the survey, as well as express any interest in helping to gather survey information from peers. DRM, and Maine’s mental health policy makers and service providers, need to be completely informed about the actual needs of consumers, by consumers, when advocating for mental health consumers/survivors to help them get access to relevant, helpful services. Come to this workshop and be part of the solution!


C7: Why I Can’t Trust You . . . Exploring Cultural Competence in IPS — Part 3 | Kelly Staples, Katharine Storer and Moon Nguany