Homework Week 3 (Wellness and Recovery Promotion)

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  • #20827
    Kristen Erickson
    Keymaster

    Exercises 
     Please Note: Do the exercise(s) before you answer the homework questions.

     

    Fill out 1-3 domains of My Recovery/Wellness Plan. Identify a goal in each domain, prioritize it, describe a barrier to achieving your goal, a strength (refer back to your strengths assessment), an action step, and supporters/community resources that might help you achieve your wellness goal.

     

    Homework Questions

     Please Note: While answering the homework questions please only share personal information or specific responses to the homework exercises you feel comfortable sharing. It is up to you to decide how much or how little to disclose. Please respect the privacy and confidentiality of clients and others in your sharing.

     

    1) What are your general reactions to this exercise of identifying wellness goals and taking action to achieve them?

    2) What did you discover about how your strengths, supporters, and or community resources might help you overcome barriers to taking an action step or reaching your goal?

    3) What are some strategies you would employ to help consumers develop and implement their own wellness/recovery plans?

     

     

    Post your answers by clicking the reply button. Make sure you keep a copy of your responses in a text file on your computer in case there is a problem submitting your comments. There is no way of retrieving the data once it is submitted. Thanks.

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    #35894
    Diana James
    Participant

    (1). My reactions were very positive because this is a very familiar process for me, as I use it regularly with my clients. My personal life goals and professional goals always seem more achievable when I write them down in this type of format. If I write them down clearly, I know that I have started the process of committing to them clearly-and this helps me “manifest” them. I also explain this process to my clients in ways that helps them understand ways they can achieve their own goals.

    (2). I realized that there were more supports available than I previously thought. It reinforced what my clients often say to me: “Until I wrote this down, I did not know I could ask for help-or that help was available should I need support”.

    (3) I spend time exploring clients dreams; sometimes helping them remember the person they were when they were younger, “before what happened to me” overwhelms them with numbness or helplessness. Helping them to “dare to dream,” to allow them to hope for something different; that they can be the author of their lives again.

    #36000
    Carrie Baker
    Participant

    1) I found the process interesting of exploring wellness goals through this exercise. I liked how this exercise broke down the different domains into smaller groups. It helped to break things down into the different domain areas to be able to focus on specific goals. This also helped to make it easier to identify specific action steps.

    2) It helped me identify more supports that I have, even if they are not local, there are still people I could reach out to for support. It also helped to think more about what resources are available in my community for the things I could use more support with, or ideas to problem solve.

    3)Using the reflections of what has worked for them in the past, and reflecting their strengths that have helped them to get through tough before. I also liked the ideas about working through ambivalence and assisting them with identifying specific triggers and barriers and developing coping plans to work through that.

    #36021
    Nicolyn Brown
    Participant

    1) What are your general reactions to this exercise of identifying wellness goals and taking action to achieve them?

    I thought it would be overwhelming, but once I chose a few categories and started it all came rather easily. Having specific action steps left me feeling motivated and made the goal feel attainable.

    2) What did you discover about how your strengths, supporters, and or community resources might help you overcome barriers to taking an action step or reaching your goal?

    I tend to think or resources as friends, family, and organizations. The exercise broadened by scope of what resources could mean in a way that would have been achieved if you simply asked me to list resources.

    3) What are some strategies you would employ to help consumers develop and implement their own wellness/recovery plans?

    Starting small. Picking maybe 2 categories to work through on the chart that have immediate and manageable action steps. The goal would be using these early/easy successes as a motivator for client buy in to use the tool for some more complicated or long term goals.

    #36030
    Patty Morini
    Participant

    1. It felt more like a commitment to myself than a public statement. I could approach it at my own level of comfort – taking smaller steps as a way to get started. It helps me face my avoidance and push my comfort zone by committing to myself, supporting and encouraging myself and being accountable to myself to JUST DO SOMETHING toward my goal.
    2. I know I have people who would cheer me on and pick me up if I fell. I can get stuck behind the barriers in my head when i KNOW my strengths deep in my heart will get me to the next step. Bringing someone into my personal goals/dreams really helps with that.
    3. Creating a PICK chart, of sorts, can be a nice way for people to identify next steps. how much energy would this particular goal or step take? What do i need to build up capacity for that? How do i nourish myself so i feel up to the task? The priority column is one great way to help others gauge their initiatives. Some people are very visual by nature, making something like this into something that they can move themselves along their path as they take the next step may prove to be both validating and motivating.

    #36041
    Kate Stearns Luce
    Participant

    1) This is a great tool! I love the way it takes a motivational approach to identify the level of commitment! It was really easy to use, and it helped me identify where the barriers are and some strengths from the previous homework that I might use to conquer those barriers! It was succinct and the action steps were motivating.

    2) I discovered that my strengths as I identified them previously can help me overcome barriers and challenges in a number of my goals. I think they also helped me develop my action steps in ways that I could use what I already have onboard for skills and this made the goal feel more attainable.

    3) I think this format is wonderful and going forward, it will be a great reminder to walk through the process with clients helping them to utilize their strengths they already have to identify action steps, build on goals, and find ways to address barriers by using the strengths they already have within them.

    #36068
    katie Varney
    Participant

    1) What are your general reactions to this exercise of identifying wellness goals and taking action to achieve them?I liked this exercise and found this is a useful tool to offer to clients I work with. I liked that this is person driven and not labeled a treatment plan. By completing this activity, for me, it felt more valid and I felt more committed by writing it down in my own words.

    2) What did you discover about how your strengths, supporters, and or community resources might help you overcome barriers to taking an action step or reaching your goal? Recognizing the supports I already have in place was reassuring for me. I found strength with in myself knowing I had resources already in place. Although I may have picked some challenging goals for myself, there is a sense of relief to look at the paper and recognize that some of those barriers are not so intimidating because of the supports I already have.

    3) What are some strategies you would employ to help consumers develop and implement their own wellness/recovery plans? Writing it out is very helpful because you can carry this were ever you go. When a difficulty comes up or a challenge, referring to the chart quickly to focus on the strengths already in place is helpful. Building on the strengths already identified will increase the clients own self- reliance and confidence

    #36069
    emilygarland
    Participant

    1) What are your general reactions to this exercise of identifying wellness goals and taking action to achieve them?

    I enjoy using tools such as this with clients and feel it is useful to move into a more active phase- especially if someone is prone to overthinking. I find that I sometimes benefit from putting things onto paper- having the visual cues helps me to brainstorm in a more dynamic way. One thing I noticed about this tool is that is would be easy to create a large goal that could feel overwhelming without some guidance or focused attention to ensure that the goal is small enough to accomplish without overwhelming progress.

    2) What did you discover about how your strengths, supporters, and or community resources might help you overcome barriers to taking an action step or reaching your goal?

    This step really made me consider how challenging it would be to come up with a list of feasible resources if I were experiencing economic insecurity or other forms of social isolation or marginalization. It seems that one needs to perceive that these resources are available to them and/or accessible in order to accept them as a resource and a strength. This is a large barrier in many instances.

    3) What are some strategies you would employ to help consumers develop and implement their own wellness/recovery plans?

    I incorporate the insights gleaned from this exercise to both ensure that the individual creates goals that are meaningful to their life and their recovery and not aimed at pleasing others or “checking boxes.” I would also make sure I set up a frame work whereby initial goals could be as lofty as they want to ensure that all options are considered before explaining that the process of creating smaller more manageable goals would be the successive phases of the process. This allows the individual to experience smaller successes along the way to the overall goal. In addition, this underscores the importance of ensuring that the individual has a strong connection to community supports and, if not, to begin exploring what it would take to create this and what it would consist of. This would likely facilitate success and a feeling of belonging to a larger community network that would benefit any plan for recovery.

    #36072
    Natalie Lonstein
    Participant

    1) What are your general reactions to this exercise of identifying wellness goals and taking action to achieve them?

    I really liked this exercise. It shed some light on my priorities and what is currently getting in the way of reaching my goals. It got me thinking deeply about potential barriers, and the importance of working through these realities because if they are not explored and planned for, they will prevent me from reaching my goals. I especially enjoyed thinking about the concrete action steps that could help me in reaching these goals. It has me considering that if I commit to taking these steps, which are attainable, I would actually be on track (or closer) to meeting my goals. I also really appreciate that the first few domains don’t typically fall into the categories we automatically think of when we consider wellness, but are still really vital pieces.

    2) What did you discover about how your strengths, supporters, and or community resources might help you overcome barriers to taking an action step or reaching your goal?

    This exercise helped me to consider what resources (strengths, supports, etc) I already have that can be harnessed to meet the goals I have outlined. With the living situation goal, the action steps I have outlined are easily attainable with commitment and conversation with my husband. When I consider some of my strengths to be vulnerability and help-seeking, both of these come into play in recognizing and being open to discussion about barriers, and then being willing to ask for help in working through the action steps to meet my goals. There is a lot of problem-solving work here, and matching strengths to needs.

    3) What are some strategies you would employ to help consumers develop and implement their own wellness/recovery plans?

    Keeping in mind that a strong focus on barriers, or things not going well, can bring down a hopeful discussion around goals and plans, I think that exploration of barriers is really important. Goals can’t be attained if there are large barriers in the way. I think very clear, open, and honest discussion around barriers that arise for consumers, and then planning for these barriers is necessary to successful recovery and wellness planning. I think that it also empowers consumers and increases confidence in meeting their wellness goals. In other words, if we have discussed all the potential barriers or issues that could arise, and have plans A-G for how to overcome them, we have a really well thought out plan for meeting these goals! I think prioritization is important because a long list is very overwhelming. I also think continued and regular exploration and reflected back to the consumer of their strengths, and how to connect this to the resources and supports that already exist for them, is an exercise in sustainability for the long run.

    #36073
    Julia Foster
    Participant

    1) What are your general reactions to this exercise of identifying wellness goals and taking action to achieve them?
    I found this exercise to be helpful to identify what my goals are and how to move through barriers. I often use this type of exercise in practice so it was a good exercise for me to practice for myself.

    2) What did you discover about how your strengths, supporters, and or community resources might help you overcome barriers to taking an action step or reaching your goal?
    I can be easy to focus on the barriers or negatives and this was a helpful reminder of how to access support and what that might look like. Writing things out allows for a more clear plan of action.

    3) What are some strategies you would employ to help consumers develop and implement their own wellness/recovery plans? I practice from strength based/recovery perspective and have used similar tools to support development of goals and steps to get there. Creating a treatment plan that does not start from recovery or does not allow the client to set the goals or pace of treatment feels disempowering and will not support someone to continue with motivation for change. During the intake process we talk through the “ideal” and then break that down into smaller goals. if someone is focused on the current challenges and unable to establish a big picture we work on day to day goals that are identified by the client.

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